Tree Frog Blog!

the official Chase Street Elementary School Library blog

Kindergarten and 1st Grade Opposite Poems

Last week, our kindergarten and first grade classes explored word relationships by creating diamante poems about pairs of opposites.

I used a Padlet wall to organize our resources, standards, and finished work for the lesson:

Click to visit!

Click to visit!

We began by reading three super quick opposite books, starting with Olivia’s Opposites by Ian Falconer:

Then, we read Skippyjon Jones: Up & Down by Judy Schachner:

And we finished with Sandra Boynton’s Oh My Oh My Oh Dinosaurs! (which you might recognize from Rachel’s shelf talker lessons with 2nd grade):

All three of these are board books intended for toddlers on up through PreK, so I tried to head off any complaints about “baby books” by explaining that I picked the books because they are quick, easy reads that would fill our heads with opposite ideas and still give us plenty of time to write!

After we read all three books, we brainstormed our own lists of opposites on a whiteboard. This list could include opposites we liked from the books as well as opposite pairs that the students came up with on our own. Once we had a board full of choices, the classes voted to pick their favorite pair.

To write our poems, we used another one of those fantastic online poetry generators from the folks at ReadWriteThink (if you’ve been keeping up with our library blog this year, you might have noticed that I use a lot of their resources!):

Screenshot from ReadWriteThink - click to visit

Screenshot from ReadWriteThink – click to visit

This poetry generator uses some challenging vocabulary for the little guys, like names for the parts of speech (adjective, verb, etc.), so as we wrote our poems together, I put the instructions in more kid-friendly language (“Who can give me a word for an action?”, “Can anyone think of a describing word?”, etc.).

While my younger students needed a lot of support, I think the diamante poem generator would be a fabulous activity for older kids to practice and review their parts of speech independently in a fun, creative way.

Each class picked a different opposite pair, and students took turns providing words for the poem, which I typed as they shared. The poems will be hung up outside the library later this week, but here they are for your reading pleasure!

I love the variety of up and down items in the middle line!

I love the variety of up and down items in the middle line!

Check out those awesome action verbs!

Check out those awesome action verbs!

I had to laugh when they added "old people" to their list of slow things. (And, of course, we had a discussion to clarify that not ALL old people are slow!)

I had to laugh when they added “old people” to their list of slow things. (And, of course, we had a discussion to clarify that not ALL old people are slow!)

What a creative opposite pair to write about--and it wasn't even from one of the books we read! Gotta love my creative kiddos.

What an imaginative opposite pair to write about–and it wasn’t even from one of the books we read! Gotta love my creative kiddos.

Since 1st grade has been learning about animal life cycles in science, Mrs. Corbett's class decided to make their smooth vs. spiny poem into a comparison of amphibians and reptiles--how cool!

Since 1st grade has been learning about animal life cycles in science, Mrs. Corbett’s class decided to make their smooth vs. spiny poem into a comparison of amphibians and reptiles–how cool!

The discussion for this poem got quite philosophical...

The discussion for this poem got quite philosophical…

Poetry month is far from over–so please check back in soon for more great poems written by our Tree Frogs! 🙂

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One comment on “Kindergarten and 1st Grade Opposite Poems

  1. Pingback: Shape Poems by PreK and Kindergarten | Tree Frog Blog!

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Image credits

Background via freeseamlesstextures.com, used with attribution under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Tree frog image public domain via openclipart.org.

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